New Animesh Pet at the MadPea Pet Friends Fair!

Greetings Folks!

I’m pleased to announce that Wilds of Organica is a proud partner showing right now at the MadPea Pet Friends Fair!

For this event, a very special animesh pet has been created which makes use of Animesh as well as Bento Bones to create a special amalgam of a couple of our favourite animals.

These cat birds are made for use rezzed at home or abroad as an attachment.

As a gachapon item, you’ll be playing for a transfer-only version, with option to exchange for mod/copy in-store.

Similar to the Chompers, they can be allowed to roam a set distance if rezzed at home. You can additionally attach them via a variety of attachment points for different animation and behaviour.

You can either attach from inventory or from rezzed pet (just click the pet while it is rezzed to be given a set of attach options!) – although we always recommend that you exchange your transfer-only pet for copyable version, using the exchanger at the main store, to prevent asset loss.

To learn more about it, please check out this info page or check it out at the pet fair, from now through July 20!

See you there!

Chompers Imminent!

Wilds of Organica has the great privilege of being a part of Gacha Garden this May and as has been touched upon in a previous post, these adorable carnivorous plants will be available! Full details for use are available here (http://www.akimeta.com/organica/?page_id=3072) but here are some quick details:

In addition to the twelve main items you can win, the Gilt Fantasy colour is available *exclusively* as a Gacha Garden Seeds of Inspiration item, which means one will be dispensed every twenty plays, but also that this particular colour will be retired once the event has ended.

This AniMesh pet can be held or rezzed on the ground, is available in 12 colours, and operates independently of any other Chomper. Rez on the ground and click to turn on/off movement or to change its movement range. Wear to hold using a Bento-friendly animation!

This pet is *also* convertible to a full avatar (with an add-on pack, sold separately at the Wilds of Organica main store).

Gacha Garden opens May 1 and runs thru May 22 – Check out WoO’s Gacha Vendor here: http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Gimme Gacha Productions/111/68/22

Looking Forward to Spring – New Cherry Trees are here!

It’s still blowing dry, powdery snow here in Toronto, but the days are slowly growing longer and with them the hope that something resembling spring will appear shortly. While winter in SL is quite pretty, having the option of renewing one’s landscape from bitter winter to tender spring with relative ease has always had great appeal to me.

It’s with that in mind that I’m happy to announce a new Cherry Tree from Organica!

Among a number of other projects on the go, this newest release has weighed heavily on my recent project list, due to amount of animation and troubleshooting that needed to take place. It’s been a few years since I last released a cherry tree, so I wanted to put together something substantial which would also reflect what tools we have at our disposal now, as far as content creation goes.

The tree is Animated Mesh, which means it is designed to sway on its own and will move naturally in its environment. It also means this tree is not resizable, although I am offering two sizes by default for your convenience. Included are Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter and Dead foliage options, along with the option to turn on flower particles. The tree is also fully compatible with the Winds of Change Seasonal Control Module, so foliage across a whole region or parcel can be changed with just a few clicks, rather than by individually by each tree.

Full details on the Organica Animesh Tree System can be found here: http://www.akimeta.com/organica/?page_id=2993

Much thanks go to NeoBokrug Elytis, who has spearheaded the scripting portion of this project and who also integrated the particle system for this tree.

This tree is available now, on-site at Organica here: http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Organica/68/197/31

It’s also available on the Marketplace, here: https://marketplace.secondlife.com/p/Organica-Cherry-Tree-5/16742898

Please note: As this is an Animesh product, You’ll need a viewer supporting SL version 6.0 or newer to view this product!

Organica at Enchantment, Feb 2019

Organica returns to Enchantment on February 9, running thru March 4th, with several new products as well as a few existing complimentary products as well!

The theme this round is Lord of the Rings, so I’ve chosen to create my own interpretation of a couple of Elven gazebos as well as Galadriel’s Mirror – drawing in lore both from the main books as well as the Silmarillion.

The Gazebos are 75LI at packaged size (20x20m) and mod/copy/no transfer. The Mirror & Plinth are a single 1 LI object, as is the accompanying silver ewer, which can be worn or simply rezzed where you wish. Mod, copy, no transfer.

Additionally, the Elven Bridges and Weeping Willows will also be available at Enchantment. Drop by my booth here!

All the new items will be exclusively at Enchantment for the duration of the event, after which they’ll make their way back to the main shop in March.

In the mean time, we’re gearing up to work on a number of spring projects moving forward. What kind of tree, plant or landscaping items do you feel are still missing? Leave your feedback here or IM me (Aki Shichiroji) in-world directly!


If you enjoy what I’m doing here or think someone else might also find it of use, please feel free to share this blog with them. If you’d like to keep up to date with posts, the RSS for this blog is here, I can also be found on Twitter and Plurk. The Discord server is here.

If you really like my stuff, perhaps consider donating to my Patreon? Your continued support helps to produce regular content (written, modelled, animated or otherwise) and helps to keep original content creation in Second Life!

Thanks for your support!

Animesh Hits Organica – Weeping Willow Trees Now Available!

It’s been a while since I discussed this project – I covered initial development for these trees in late 2017/early 2018, but they were put on the back-burner due to a shadow rendering issue that affects how shadows are rendered for transparent textures on rigged objects.

While previously this was a known (but low priority) issue for avatars, it’s become increasingly necessary for Linden Lab to address this with the onset of Animesh. Fortunately, Graham Linden has been tasked with finding a solution and progress on the issue appears imminent (Inara Pey reports a solution has been developed and waiting for release via the viewer pipeline eventually).

With all that said, I decided to move ahead with the Weeping Willow despite this problem because it would be unlikely that any changes be made to accommodate shader fixes on the viewer side, once they have been committed. 

In the past week, easily 30-40 hrs have been put in developing new textures and revising existing animations to be more natural and appropriate to region wind speeds. I’ve also been very fortunate to work with NeoBokrug Elytis of Desolate Studio to develop an extensive feature set that I am sure you will appreciate!

So it’s with much excitement that I offer this set of Weeping Willows for your consideration:

Features:

The Weeping Willows are the first in a line of trees from Organica that will both offer Animesh support as well as built-in compatibility with the Organica Seasonal Control Module, which will allow for mass foliage change of Organica: Winds of Change-compatible products both region-wide as well as parcel-specific.

The Willows are set to animate and rustle in relation to Second Life region wind. They change texture (Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter, Dead) on command from the included SCM, but you can also set foliage by individual tree as well if you wish.

All settings can be secured to owner, group or anyone.

A few caveats:

  • As an Animesh product, a compatible viewer must be used to view it properly. If your viewer has updated to 6.0 or better, you’re all set!
  • Due to the nature of Animesh (it snaps back to the size defined by its armature and animations), only two sizes are currently offered and this tree cannot be resized. I’ll be doing some experimentation and hopefully more sizes will be available in the future – any additional sizes to this product will be sent as a free update.
  • As discussed above, shadows from this product are not currently cast properly. Keep an eye on JIRA BUG-202837 or at Content Creation User Group Meetings for movement on this problem – I will also announce once I learn this has been fixed.

The Weeping Willows are offered mod, copy, no transfer with copy-only scripts, animations and sounds and are optimized to 23LI each (Land-impact of future additional sizes may vary). Full documentation for use of the Organica Animesh Tree System available here.

Special thanks to Aposiopesis Fullstop for her consultation on our documentation as well as the Residents of The Wastelands for being our guinea-pigs in our latter testing stage.

You can pick up the Weeping Willow 3 pack, mod/copy object, copy-only contents, in-world here and on the Marketplace, here

A few lingering thoughts on Animesh

As some of you may be aware, Linden Lab has announced the release of the Animated Mesh Object project, which has been in development for around 18 months. Essentially, it allows any rigged object (Avatars, clothing, accessories, and beyond) to be animated smoothly without being worn.

It’s been interesting to sit in on all of the tweaks along the way and to create test content along the way, even though sometimes doing so made me want to apply head to desk in rapid succession (Such is the case with any extended project of this scale, really).

Now that the project’s out, I have to say I feel a sense of both relief and anxiety – both for built up projects which I can release and projects which are still being held back by technical difficulties, but above and beyond, what the future holds.

In some ways, Animesh means an easy way for folks to repurpose some of their rigged mesh purchases towards innovative NPCs and other interactive objects.

For avatars, at least, it’s possible to rez a copy on the ground, drop in some animations and script potential animated behaviour, allowing that avatar to roam freely. 

These same avatars can be repurposed (if additional animations are added to support this) to operate as standalone OR held/worn pets.

But there are a few restrictions and caveats:

  • Those expecting to simply take a high-poly mesh body, add complex rigged mesh clothing to it, along with footwear, jewellry and other accessories may be disappointed. A polygon limit of 100,000 triangles per linkset remains in place.
  • Even if a linkset comes in well below this polycount, unoptimized content has the potential to be of significant LI cost.
  • Some rendering problems persist – particularly when it comes to the rendering of shadows as they are cast from rigged content. Whereas this was less noticeable only on avatars, with Animesh, any animated object stands to unintentionally  cast a fairly blocky shadow. This is supposedly being worked on by Graham Linden, but to date I have not seen any positive change on this matter.
  • There is a per-avatar limit of one animesh linkset (two, if you are a Premium member)

Additionally, time will tell, but I have some concern over the last-minute addition of two linksets being made available. At this week’s Content Creation User Group meeting, Vir recognized it as appearing to be a last-minute addition, claiming any open discussion of the matter just hadn’t been possible. To me, the problem is not so much that the announcement appeared last-minute as the fact that there appeared to have been no real heavy load testing for such circumstances. 

Residents have always pushed the limits of what building and appearance tools have been given to them – I don’t see the emergence of Animesh as being any different. Add to that the fact that any worn object does not immediately present an easy to read and recognize performance cost metric and there is significant potential for abuse.

With that said, that there are caveats at all is a good thing – I would seriously be concerned if there had been no limitations – it would make my concern over multiple linksets all the more pressing if the max polycount were higher.

If anything, I do hope most of these limitations encourages folks to seek out content that is dedicated for use with Animesh, rather than simply depending on existing content to fit their needs. 

I am honestly pleased that  it’s now available to the public and I do think it offers to spark a lot of creativity for existing and newcomer artists. I *do* think it requires a wider skill set – it requires scripting and additional animation over and above modelling, texturing and rigging, if you are a clothing-maker… but perhaps this will be a push towards greater learning or collaboration for those who need it.

How do you feel about Animesh? Has Linden Lab made it clear what it is? What kind of things do you look forward to seeing now that it’s here? Are you going to try your hand at making some?


If you enjoy what I’m doing here or think someone else might also find it of use, please feel free to share this blog with them. If you’d like to keep up to date with posts, the RSS for this blog is here, I can also be found on Twitter and Plurk. The Discord server is here.

If you really like my stuff, perhaps consider donating to my Patreon? Your continued support helps to produce regular content (written, modelled, animated or otherwise) and helps to keep original content creation in Second Life!

Thanks for your support!

Animesh on the Main Grid & Snakes On My Head

It’s been a long while since I first posted about Animesh. Apparently, it’s been a good 18 months since Linden Lab started working on it, and just this week, the new functionality hit the AGNI grid (not just on RC channels) completely. If you have not yet updated your SL viewer to 6.0.0 or higher, you may wish to do so now!

That LL announcement was the final kick in the butt I needed to finalize the look & feel as well as packaging and pricing for my new Medusa Gorgon Hair.

While I would have preferred to have released these prior to Halloween, it just didn’t work out from a scheduling and feasibility point of view. With that said, I am glad LL took their time to ensure all their ducks are in a row moving forward, and look forward to making much more content that takes advantage of the new functionality.

White-snaked Medusa hair made by Wilds of Organica. Snapshot taken at Lost Unicorn. Head: Lightstar Lin Head. Dress: *MC* Empire Maxi Dress

For full details, please be sure to try the demo and to read the documentation fully. There are some caveats relating to Animated Mesh objects which may affect the product’s utility for you. 

Now available in-store, here!


If you enjoy what I’m doing here or think someone else might also find it of use, please feel free to share this blog with them. If you’d like to keep up to date with posts, the RSS for this blog is here, I can also be found on Twitter and Plurk. The Discord server is here.

If you really like my stuff, perhaps consider donating to my Patreon? Your continued support helps to produce regular content (written, modelled, animated or otherwise) and helps to keep original content creation in Second Life!

Thanks for your support!

Corgi Updates!

Greetings!

I’m recovering from a couple of setbacks this week. I have been recovering from a bit of a cold – the weather here is warming up slightly, which always means more colds and flu floating around.  That said, I figured I’d update you of my progress on the corgi.

Animation has been progressing well. Our corgi can now walk, run, jump, swim, crouch, sneak, and has some limited ground sits. I’ll be working on some object sits soon. At this time, I’d say the animations are around 70% done, although I’d like to do some more specific animations that will also take advantage of sounds and keystrokes via SL’s gesture assets.

Textures have also been dialed in a bit from previous posts, with the help of Substance Painter (which underwent a major UI change recently). It’s been interesting to make use of their texture resize feature, which allows for quicker brush stroke application at lower resolutions but which preserves the type of brush stroke if you need to flip up to higher resolutions, allowing for the higher detail to be preserved as one sizes up.

Predictably, all of this brush stroke recording does become a bit memory intensive, so I predict that some export to Photoshop at some point will be necessary for me as I begin to work in some of the other coats I want to work on.

Fantasy Faire arrives soon (next month – runs April 19-29) so moving forward, I’d like to tie this up and revisit the wyvern for use as an avatar before addressing some other Fantasy Faire exclusive editions for certain items. Additionally, you can look forward to some Organica content soon at Bloom (also next month – Runs April 15-30).

It’s still unknown as to whether Animesh will be made available on the main grid by Fantasy Faire – In all likelihood, I doubt it. Linden Lab has always been reticent to put out a specific deadline for releases like this and as of the most recent meeting, true testing for final LI accounting and poly-count limits has not yet concluded.

It’s for that reason that I’ll be mostly concentrating on avatar-related releases for this year’s Fantasy Faire – and if the opportunity for Animesh arrives subsequent to that, I’ll deal with Animesh kits as the need arises.

With that said, what kind of animations and functionality would you like to see out of a pet corgi?

Leave comments below or message me directly in-world at Aki Shichiroji.

See you next week!


If you enjoy what I’m doing here or think someone else might also find it of use, please feel free to share this blog with them. If you’d like to keep up to date with posts, the RSS for this blog is here, I can also be found on Twitter and Plurk. The Discord server is here.

If you really like my stuff, perhaps consider donating to my Patreon? Your continued support helps to produce weekly content (written, modelled, animated or otherwise) and helps to keep original content creation in Second Life!

Thanks for your support!

Willow Tree Process (Part 4) – Rigging and animating

A small amount of downtime over the past couple of days has given me the opportunity to move forward with my Animesh Willow experiment.

At this point, I have to mention that this is all it is – an experiment. In the course of playing with animating a tree, I ran in to a number of hurdles which I’ll have to consider whether I want to get around before any possible release. (I’ll go in to these a little later).

From the hint that animesh might be a thing, I’d been thinking about using it for more efficient modelling of animated vegetation. Willows are the most obvious candidate for me, since I’ve long avoided creating more.

Original solutions for willows have historically included flexiprims and while these may still prove useful, I wanted to see what I could come up with that wouldn’t be so taxing on the viewer. The opportunity to create something that isn’t so heavily dependant on SL wind is also promising.

My willow tree armature required  some significant modification of the default Bento avatar armature.

Currently, Avastar allows a user to select and move bone joints for either the blue/purple SL armature or green Control Bones in edit mode, then to align them to their counterparts. This is what I did and (so far) I haven’t needed to adjust any of the parenting for this rig.

I opted not to make use of the lower limbs (for now) because doing so can present some orientation issues due to how bones are parented. If i need to in the future, I may put in more time to figure this out, but in this particular use case, I chose to just use the bones from torso up, arms, hands, wings, neck and head (no face), simply because these would handle the geometry sufficiently.

The result is, in a very general sense, positive.

For the most part, the trunk was parented to bones which are logically closer to the middle of the skeleton. So it got torso, chest, collarbones, upper, lower arm, neck, head, etc. Most of the fingers got assigned to equidistant areas around the trunk for foliage.

In hindsight, I would probably rig and model concurrently. Because there was a significant amount of foliage geometry mixed together, selecting appropriate foliage and assigning it to its nearest bone was a bit tedious. Doing this a bit at a time to ensure proper movement would have been the better way to go.

Fortunately, Avastar offers a means of checking for unweighted verts, so this process was made a bit easier as a result.

Weighting was undertaken mostly using the weight painting brush, but occasionally I would also hold down Ctrl while making my brush strokes to create a gradient of weights for my selected vertices.

Because there were so many vertices in relatively close proximity, I selected the bones I wanted in weight-painting mode, then hit ‘V’ to show vertices. I then selected the vertices I wanted to paint (rather than painting on everything)  and brushed on only the areas highlighted by the selected vertices.

Animating the tree:

Once all of the vertices in the geometry were assigned, it was time to try some basic animation. So far, I’ve just put together a basic sway animation as a test case, but I may continue to create a variety of other animations the tree can play on command.

In order to create an animation, I split off a window pane in Blender and switch it to ‘Dope Sheet’ view. This gives me a frame-by-frame listing of bones for which location and/or rotation* has changed, over time (in frames). There are other more detailed and useful views you can use for animation, but this is the most basic view you’ll need right away.

(* Scale changes are ignored by SL, both on the armature and animation side.)

The Dopesheet operates mostly from left to right, although it does list off bones which have been weighted, on the left hand side as ‘channels’. When a bone is selected in 3D view, the appropriate channel will highlight in the Dopesheet view. On the flipside, you can also left-click the name of the bone in Dopesheet view to select the bone in 3D view.

To animate, we need to ‘keyframe’ a set of changes in rotation and/or location and have Blender interpolate these transitions from keyframe to keyframe. In this case, the chief translations we need to make will be rotational.

To begin, I select every bone in the armature and keyframe the current rotation as a keyframe (Hotkey I, select ‘Rotation’). This will be my starting frame.

Next, we need to create the second position for the appropriate bones. Since I am only moving the hanging foliage, I select the appropriate bones (mostly just finger bones) and rotate them in the general direction I want.

Then, since I just want to test and loop motion between these two keyframes, I select all of the points from the first keyframe, duplicate them and move them to where I want my end frame to go, allowing the animation to seamlessly move from the last frame to the first when it loops.

 

Next, we need to define our export settings to convert these keyframes to a full blown animation that can be used in Second Life.

Of note: Normally, frames per second (FPS) is set around 24. This particular animation has been slowed down significantly such that only two frames play per second, for a much more subtle effect. This can be played with depending on application – sometimes I will tinker with this to speed up or slow down walk-loops for avatars.

By default, I export .ANIM files instead of .BVH files – I don’t play much with the system morphs that come with .BVH and in this case, such morphs (system avatar-based facial expressions, hand gestures) are not applicable to this sort of content.

Once I have defined the start and end frame for the animation as well as the start and end frame for the loop (not always the same!), I click ‘Export: AvatarAction’ and save it with an appropriate file name.

In-world, I enable my willow as an ‘Animated Mesh’ object and drop the animation in to the mesh. Some additional scripts are needed to make use of this animation – some sample scripts to get you started can be found on the Animesh regions on ADITI grid currently. Hopefully we’ll see some more sample scripts on the wiki soon too.

The result:

Current downsides:

  • Animesh currently can’t be resized. They make use of the armature, where the size is defined upon upload. It may be necessary to create several different sizes for variety and, depending on application, special attention to scaled animations may be necessary as well.
  • Transparent textures placed upon Animesh-enabled geometry currently do not cast a correct shadow.
  • Base 200LI – this is likely to change for the better. Vir Linden has always maintained that the current 200LI base is boilerplate and mainly intended to be more restrictive than the ultimate release. Once I have a better idea of base cost, I’ll have a better idea of whether I’d like to move ahead with further LOD optimization and more detailed animations.

So for now, this willow will be on my backburner until we have more info from the weekly content creation meetings (Thursdays at 1PM SLT, Animesh 4 region on ADITI grid).

In any case, I wish you all a very Happy New Year!

I’ve had the fortune of being able to pick up more work in the past year and also the opportunity to present my thoughts and new releases with you lately here on the blog – I’m really looking forward to keeping the ball rolling in the coming year and hope to have more to share with you soon!


If you found this or any other of my articles helpful, please consider becoming a Patron! Doing so supports further articles of this kind and my content creation in general.  Alternatively, if you like the sorts of things that I make for Second Life, drop by my Marketplace listing or my in-world stores and check out what I have to offer!

Unless otherwise noted, I (Aki Shichiroji) and this blog are not sponsored in any way. My thoughts are my own and not indicative of endorsement by any associated or discussed product/service/company.

 

Ahead of Animesh: Efficiency

There has been a lot of talk, recently, with regard to what is and isn’t possible within the platform when it comes to content creation and detail. We see this complaint come up commonly with all content, but more recently this has become more of a touchy issue with the coming of Animesh (animated mesh) objects, which are currently being tested on the Beta grid.

As things go, Animesh is currently limited to 20Ktris per linkset, which means that content creators have to be very cautious about the complexity of the models they intend to use.

The most immediate use case being presented are full scale animated NPCs based on existing mesh content (bodies, clothing, hair). Additional use cases include accessorizing of rezzable pets, customization of vehicles, and more.

However, the efficacy of Animesh in terms of accomplishing those goals is questionable.

As things stand, the current limitations (20KTris per linkset, minimum 200LI cost for animated mesh objects) are deliberately conservative so as to accurately assess graphic and server load under heavy use. These limitations are likely to change, but some of the suggestions as far as to what degree have been quite far-ranging. At recent user group meetings, we’ve seen suggestions anywhere from 100-500KTris per linkset so as to accommodate clothing, hair and body mesh.

This might not seem like a lot but for the moment let’s argue that the average fashionista might themselves average between 250-800Ktri range. Today in SL, this is only just manageable in a room with multiple such avatars because we can now elect to filter out performance-heavy individuals by using Avatar Complexity filters. (If you frequently allow your viewer not to do this, chances are you spend a fair amount on a new video card every couple of years. Not everyone can afford that!)

There is no immediate indication that we will have any similar functionality with Animesh. Apart from the polycount restriction and LI, there is also no immediate restriction on how many animesh can be drawn by your camera. As such, placing multiple such linksets in a given area may well create a negative experience for a large portion of the SL userbase, who may not have the most up to date equipment for enjoying Second Life.

It begs the question of content creators – Notwithstanding any easement of these restrictions, what can we as content creators do to create more efficient models for use as Animesh (or even for daily use on our own avatars)?

 

Design with efficiency in mind.

There are many workflows out there. Some of us are working with Blender, Maya, 3DSMax, SketchUp, ZBrush or even Marvelous Designer.

I am hesitant to point out any one workflow as being ‘bad’, but frankly some of these workflows are designed for higher-detail applications and not for immediate use in gaming.

Does this mean I think they shouldn’t be used?

Not at all, however it’s important for content creators to understand what kind of issues they are introducing to the viewer experience when they present un-optimized content to the consumer market, what the repercussions may be and how to mitigate them.

For example, Marvelous Designer allows designers to create garments based on traditional patterning and to see how those garments will fall on an avatar, but even with the recent addition of its quadrangulate functionality, it produces mesh with counter-intuitive edge flow. Additionally, the common practice with MD is to simply export a high-poly mesh to include fine details and call it a day, without regard to how that might impact the viewer in SL.

We have similar problems with ZBrush, which can handle millions of vertices at a time and which does have a means of retopology (making something less complex), but which still requires a lot of tweaking to create something with good enough edgeflow to work well in lower poly situations.

You can work from low-poly to high or high-poly to low based on your preference, but it should be noted that the average avatar doesn’t actually *need* Pixar-level graphic fidelity in their everyday SL experience.

Wyvern material comparison
Most people think this wyvern comes out to around 50KTri or more – in actuality, with the use of normal maps, it is far far less (at 14KTri), and the final product may even be less depending on final refinements.

Rather than importing garments to SL with every possible nook and cranny modelled in geometry, designers can (and should) make use of the tools afforded them by advanced materials! This can be done by baking down some of the details from their higher-poly models to diffuse maps but also by creating normal and specular maps that will take advantage of textures instead of geometry to create detail.

Normal maps can make a huge difference when it comes to conveying details! This blouse is under 4KTri,, animates cleanly and still has subtle seam and cloth fold information which some would otherwise model out in geometry.

With this sort of workflow in mind, a 20KTri blouse could easily be reduced to 4-5KTri with minimal detail loss.

Even more savings can be had if animesh are designed and modelled with these restrictions in mind, rather than cobbled together from multiple sources.

With a custom designed animesh human, for example, there is no need to include a full mesh body – only those parts which are visible need be included. Clothing, hair, accessories – all of these can be developed with efficiency in mind to fit the criteria for Animesh limits.

Level of Detail models are also helpful with reducing viewer load at a distance, given the fact that Animesh do not currently become imposters at a distance (even though they express sped up animations just as avatars do).

 

Balance

Of course, it’s helpful not to think of SL purely in terms of efficiency. We could all just wear stick-figures or rez them and call it a day… but if the visual element were removed what would be the point?

Instead, I’d love to see limitations on these resources to encourage both more efficiency as well as stylistic choices that deviate from the norm. There is a vast niche of style that continues to go untapped within the platform and I’d be really interested to see more interesting art styles rather than a constant push towards photo-realism, personally.